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Education

Sales Tax Flexibility Not Enough to Solve Georgia’s School Funding Crisis

February 19, 2014

Bill Analysis: House Resolution 1109 and House Bill 802
The General Assembly is considering putting a constitutional amendment to a statewide vote to give school districts greater flexibility to spend sales tax money. Districts continue to struggle financially due to ongoing cuts in state funding, including an austerity cut of… [Read more]

Overview: 2015 Fiscal Year Budget for Higher Education

January 29, 2014

Funding Inches Up, Gaps Persist
Georgia’s proposed $1.94 billion budget for higher education in the 2015 fiscal year adds some much needed money for several key initiatives compared to the prior year. However most of the increase just keeps pace with growth and rising health care and retirement costs. This… [Read more]

Overview: 2015 Fiscal Year Budget for K-12 Education

January 23, 2014

Budget Cuts for K-12 Shrink, but Still Loom Large
The $7.95 billion budget proposal for public education in the state’s 2015 fiscal year makes a down payment to eliminate the austerity cut in state funding for schools. Most districts should be able to restore the school calendar to the 180-day… [Read more]

Overview: 2015 Fiscal Year Budget for Lottery-Funded Programs

January 22, 2014

Funding for Pre-Kindergarten and HOPE Falls Short of Students’ Needs
The governor’s proposed $948 million budget for the state’s lottery-funded programs in the 2015 fiscal year falls short of what is needed to provide Georgians broad access to pre-kindergarten and higher education programs. Georgia’s 20-year-old system that uses lottery proceeds… [Read more]

Tax Shift Proposals Would Hurt Georgia Schools

November 18, 2013

Plans to drastically cut or abolish state income taxes and replace them with higher sales taxes are gaining traction in Georgia. These tax shift plans threaten to harm Georgia’s schoolchildren and university students because deep income tax cuts would likely lead to new rounds of state budget cuts, on top… [Read more]

Cutting Class to Make Ends Meet

November 6, 2013

Georgia’s public schools are at a tipping point. School districts are coping with state funding cuts in recent years by shrinking the school calendar, increasing class sizes and furloughing teachers. A new survey of school districts by the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute (GBPI) finds school systems throughout the state… [Read more]

The Schoolhouse Squeeze

September 17, 2013

State Cuts, Plunging Property Values Pinch School Districts
Georgia’s school districts are struggling against a relentless financial squeeze. The Georgia Legislature cut billions in state funding for public schools in recent years, while plunging property values drove down the main local source of revenue, the property tax. Meanwhile, the number… [Read more]

The Schoolhouse Squeeze Report Summary

September 17, 2013

State Cuts, Plunging Property Values Pinch School Districts
School districts across Georgia are relentlessly pressed by ongoing cuts in state funding and simultaneous declines in property values. “The Schoolhouse Squeeze,” a new report from the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, takes a fresh look at the convergence of shrinking state… [Read more]

GBPI 2014 Primer: Education

July 9, 2013

The $9.7 billion Georgia is investing in education in 2014 accounts for more than half of all state expenses. Still, Georgia’s investment in education is falling, even as its expectations of what they will accomplish are rising. The education section of the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute’s Budget Primer explains… [Read more]

Transparency for Private School Scholarships Improves

March 8, 2013

Senate Bill 243 (SB 243), unlike the related House Bill 140 (HB 140) introduced earlier in 2013 legislative session, would bring overdue focus, transparency and accountability to the private school scholarship tax credit program. But it does not end its annual expansion. The proposed changes would encourage making students with… [Read more]